Important information on STAAR testing
02/24/2021

Dr. Gutierrez shares important information on STAAR examinations in these letters to parents.

 

English Letter

Spanish Letter


Upcoming ECHS Parent Session
02/24/2021

Seguin Early College High School is hosting a parent session for the class of 2025.  The meeting will be on Friday, February 26, at SISD Central Office in the PLC Room (formerly Mercer Blumberg Learning Center).

This informational flyer has all the meeting details for the session.


Upcoming Board Meeting
02/22/2021

The Seguin ISD Board of Trustees will be hosting a regular meeting on February 25th. You can find the agenda at the link below:

 

February 25 - Regular Board Meeting

 


Student meals available Sat., Feb. 20
02/19/2021

Student meals will be distributed to Seguin ISD students on Saturday, Feb. 20, from 10 a.m. to noon at the Child Nutrition Office located at 1105 N. King St.

 

The meals will be available to those students who are 18 or under. Student/child can be present. If the student/child is not present, an ID, report card, birth certificate or other student ID is required.

 

Las comidas de los estudiantes se distribuirán a los estudiantes de Seguin ISD el sábado 20 de febrero de 10 a.m. a mediodía en la Oficina de Nutrición Infantil ubicada en 1105 N. King St.

 

Las comidas estarán disponibles para aquellos estudiantes que tengan 18 años o menos. El estudiante / niño puede estar presente. Si el estudiante / niño no está presente, se requiere una identificación, boleta de calificaciones, certificado de nacimiento u otra identificación de estudiante.


Student meals available today
02/19/2021

The Seguin ISD Child Nutrition team is ready to distribute 1,100 meals to students in need from 2-3 p.m. today (Feb. 19) at the Seguin High School bus loop (at the back of the building). Seguin High School is located at 1315 E. Cedar. The bus loop can be accessed from Lamar St.

 

The meals will be available to those students who are 18 or under. Student/child can be present. If the student/child is not present, an ID, report card, birth certificate or other student ID is required.

 

El equipo de Nutrición Infantil de Seguin ISD está listo para distribuir 1,100 comidas a los estudiantes necesitados de 2 a 3 p.m. hoy (19 de febrero) en el circuito de autobuses de Seguin High School (en la parte trasera del edificio). Seguin High School está ubicada en 1315 E. Cedar. Se puede acceder al circuito de autobús desde Lamar St.

 

Las comidas estarán disponibles para aquellos estudiantes que tengan 18 años o menos. El estudiante / niño puede estar presente. Si el estudiante / niño no está presente, se requiere una identificación, boleta de calificaciones, certificado de nacimiento u otra identificación de estudiante.


Seguin ISD Closure - 02.18 & 02.19
02/17/2021

Seguin ISD schools and offices will remain closed through Friday, Feb. 19, 2021.  We look forward to our students returning on Monday. 

 

Las escuelas y oficinas de Seguin ISD permanaecerá cerradas hasta el viernes 19 de febrero de 2021.  Esperamos que nuestros estudiantes regresen el lunes. 


Seguin ISD Closure - 02.17.2021
02/16/2021

Feb. 17, 2021 School Closure

 

Seguin ISD schools and offices will be closed on Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021 due to freezing and icy conditions forecast for today, tonight and tomorrow morning. All school activities for Feb. 17 are cancelled. Conditions will be continuously monitored and assessed throughout the week. Every effort will be made to communicate additional changes, if any, in a timely manner.

 

17 de febrero de 2021 cierre de escuelas

 

Las escuelas y oficinas de Seguin ISD estarán cerradas el miércoles 17 de febrero de 2021 debido a las condiciones de congelación y heladas pronosticadas para hoy, esta noche y mañana por la mañana. Todas las actividades escolares para el 17 de febrero están canceladas. Las condiciones serán monitoreadas y evaluadas continuamente durante la semana. Se hará todo lo posible para comunicar cambios adicionales, si los hubiera, de manera oportuna.


Seguin ISD Closure - 02.16.2021
02/15/2021

Seguin ISD,

Due to continued freezing and icy conditions forecast for today, tonight and tomorrow, Seguin ISD schools and offices will be closed on Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021.

 

Conditions will be continuously monitored and assessed throughout the week. Every effort will be made to communicate additional changes, if any, in a timely manner.

 

Stay safe and warm, Matadors!

 

Seguin ISD,
Debido al pronóstico de condiciones de congelación y congelación continua para hoy, esta noche y mañana, las escuelas y oficinas de Seguin ISD estarán cerradas el martes 16 de febrero de 2021.

 

Las condiciones serán monitoreadas y evaluadas continuamente durante la semana. Se hará todo lo posible para comunicar cambios adicionales, si los hubiera, de manera oportuna.

 

¡Manténganse a salvo y cálidos, matadores!


Seguin ISD Celebrates Black History Month - Guadalupe College
02/11/2021

Guadalupe College

 

Guadalupe College (or College of the Guadalupe Baptist Association), an educational institution for African Americans located in Seguin, was founded in 1884 by members of the Guadalupe Baptist Association. This organization included Black Baptist congregations from Guadalupe and surrounding counties. Its leaders were Dr. William B. Ball, a Black Civil War veteran, minister, and school official who came to Seguin in 1871, and Rev. Leonard Ilsley, a White itinerant preacher. Trustees for the association purchased a large piece of property, three blocks west of the Guadalupe County Courthouse, that had been the site of several other schools. It is the present-day campus of Joe F. Saegert School.

 

The first official session of Guadalupe College opened in 1887 with J. H. Garnett as president. The state of Texas granted a charter to the institution on March 28, 1888. The purpose of the school was to awaken educational interest among the Blacks of Texas and to train teachers and religious leaders. Like White institutions of the time, the college department offered four years of classical courses, which led to a bachelor of arts degree. Other departments, designated as preparatory, primary, theological, musical, and industrial, offered a variety of courses and certificates. The State Board of Education endorsed Guadalupe College as a school of the first rank from 1902 until 1906; it was the only Black Baptist institution of higher learning in South Texas. Annual enrollment during the first 12 years averaged more than 200 and reached a high of more than 450 in 1907. Though students came from all over Texas, most were from Guadalupe County and surrounding areas.

 

Financial support of the college came primarily from Black Baptists, who contributed individually, through their district church associations, and through the statewide Baptist Missionary and Educational Convention. Philanthropist George W. Brackenridge of San Antonio donated generously to the operation and development of the college. His gifts included funds for a new chapel-auditorium and a valuable 216-acre tract on the Guadalupe River west of Seguin. To defray expenses, students maintained the grounds and buildings and built all new structures. The charter provided for a board of trustees to direct the school's affairs, although in practice the board-appointed president exercised extensive control. David Abner, Jr., a prominent Bishop College graduate active in church and Republican politics, succeeded Garnett as president in 1891. The college flourished during his 15 year tenure and attracted attention throughout the state.

 

Conflict with trustees forced Abner's resignation in 1906. His successor was W. B. Ball. Supporters of the school decided to begin anew and in 1914 moved the facility to the Guadalupe River farm property. Brackenridge, who favored expansion of the vocational program, contributed funds for construction of two modern brick buildings. The administration, convinced that a liberal arts education was more important, continued to maintain a traditional college department, as well as an academy and grammar school, with only incidental training in agriculture and trades. In keeping with the institution's religious orientation, students were required to give evidence of good moral character and to attend weekly prayer meetings and Sunday school. They also worked a specified number of hours each day for the college.

 

The Texas Department of Education classified Guadalupe College as a standard junior college in 1926 and accepted its credits in granting teacher certification. The institution was officially designated a senior college in May 1929. Presidents from 1921 until 1936 were Charles H. Griggs, F. G. S. Everett, and J. R. Lockett; attendance in the early 1930s averaged 60 in the college division and 125 in the academy.

 

Unfortunately for Black Baptists, the success of their school was short-lived. Hard-pressed financially by the Great Depression, Guadalupe College returned to junior college status in 1931 and suffered a fatal blow when fire destroyed the main building on February 9, 1936. Although the General Baptist Convention eventually built another building and conducted classes for ministers and lay leaders in the 1940s, efforts to reestablish a fully accredited college failed. The Texas secretary of state issued a new charter to the College of the Guadalupe Baptist Association in 1971, and alumni refurbished a wooden chapel to accommodate group meetings. No regular classes are conducted on the site, however.

 

Guadalupe College represented an important phase in the history of Black education, a phase dominated by the church-sponsored college. Its evolution, from a multipurpose facility offering instruction at all levels to an accredited college, paralleled closely with other Black institutions throughout the South. Guadalupe College contributed substantially to the advancement of African-American youth in South Texas. It offered educational opportunities superior to those provided to Blacks by public facilities, and it trained leaders for the Black community, particularly teachers and ministers. Most significantly, it fostered pride and self-respect.

 

W‌ritten by Anne Brawner for the Texas State Historical Association's Handbook of Texas


Seguin ISD Celebrates Black History Month - Teyran Patterson
02/05/2021

Teyran Patterson

 

Teyran Patterson, Matador class of 1998 and Seguin native, was lovingly known by his family and friends as “Ty.” The community remembers Teyran as a clean cut, honest, truth speaking, and fair young man that would give the shirt off of his back to anyone in need. He attended Juan Seguin, Ball Elementary, Weinert Elementary, Saegert Middle School and Seguin High School.

 

He was a standout athlete from a young age, starting on the little league fields that are named in his honor today. He played second and third base and was a home run hitter. In senior league he hit four home runs in one game. He also played football, basketball and track at Seguin High School. He attended Cisco Junior College on a full scholarship where he suffered a concussion that ended his football career. After leaving Cisco JC, he attended Texas State University and earned a degree in Criminal Justice.

 

A friend of the Patterson family and a TPWD game warden captain saw Tyran at a river outing and insisted that he explore a career as a game warden. Teyran was a graduate of the 51st Texas Game Warden Academy in 2005 and was stationed in Johnson County. On May 30, 2007 Teyran lost his life in the line of duty while working with his partner to recover a girl’s body in the raging waters of the Paluxy River near Cleburne. In 2017, Guadalupe County and state officials honored Ty by dedicating State Highway 123 Business in his honor. Teyran will always be remembered for his service, pure heart and contagious smile.


Federal Report Cards
02/03/2021

For information on Federal Report Cards, please read this letter from Dr. Gutierrez.

 

Para obtener información sobre las boletas de calificaciones federales, lea esta carta del Dr. Gutiérrez.